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English

 

Language is the basis for thinking, communicating, learning, and viewing the world.

Students need language skills in order to comprehend ideas and information, to interact

socially, to inquire into areas of interest and study, and to express themselves clearly and

demonstrate their learning. Learning to communicate with clarity and precision will help

students to thrive in the world beyond school.

 

Language is a fundamental element of identity and culture. As students read and reflect

on a rich variety of literary, informational, and media texts,1 they develop a deeper understanding

of themselves and others and of the world around them. If they see themselves

and others in the texts they study, they will be more engaged in learning and they will

also come to appreciate the nature and value of a diverse, multicultural society. They will

develop the ability to understand and critically interpret a range of texts and to recognize

that a text conveys one particular perspective among many. (http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/curriculum/

secondary/english1112currb.pdf).

 

English - ENG1D

This course is designed to develop the oral communication, reading, writing, and media

literacy skills that students need for success in their secondary school academic programs

and in their daily lives. Students will analyse literary texts from contemporary and historical

periods, interpret informational and graphic texts, and create oral, written, and media texts

in a variety of forms. An important focus will be on the use of strategies that contribute

to effective communication. The course is intended to prepare students for the Grade 10

academic English course, which leads to university or college preparation courses in

Grades 11 and 12.

Prerequisite: None

 

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 %

 

English - ENG2D

This course is designed to extend the range of oral communication, reading, writing, and

media literacy skills that students need for success in their secondary school academic

programs and in their daily lives. Students will analyse literary texts from contemporary

and historical periods, interpret and evaluate informational and graphic texts, and create

oral, written, and media texts in a variety of forms. An important focus will be on the

selective use of strategies that contribute to effective communication. This course is

intended to prepare students for the compulsory Grade 11 university or college preparation

course.

Prerequisite: English, Grade 9, Academic or Applied

 

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 %

 

English - ENG3U

This course emphasizes the development of literacy, communication, and critical and

creative thinking skills necessary for success in academic and daily life. Students will

analyse challenging literary texts from various periods, countries, and cultures, as well

as a range of informational and graphic texts, and create oral, written, and media texts

in a variety of forms. An important focus will be on using language with precision and

clarity and incorporating stylistic devices appropriately and effectively. The course

is intended to prepare students for the compulsory Grade 12 university or college

preparation course.

Prerequisite: English, Grade 10, Academic

 

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 %

 

Presentation and Speaking Skills - EPS3O

This course emphasizes the knowledge and skills required to plan and make effective

presentations and to speak effectively in both formal and informal contexts, using such

forms as reports, speeches, debates, panel discussions, storytelling, recitations, interviews,

and multimedia presentations. Students will research and analyse the content and

characteristics of convincing speeches and the techniques of effective speakers; design

and rehearse presentations for a variety of purposes and audiences; select and use visual

and technological aids to enhance their message; and assess the effectiveness of their

own and others’ presentations.

Prerequisite: English, Grade 10, Academic or Applied

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 %

 

English - ENG4U

This course emphasizes the consolidation of the literacy, communication, and critical and

creative thinking skills necessary for success in academic and daily life. Students will

analyse a range of challenging literary texts from various periods, countries, and cultures;

interpret and evaluate informational and graphic texts; and create oral, written, and media

texts in a variety of forms. An important focus will be on using academic language coherently

and confidently, selecting the reading strategies best suited to particular texts and particular

purposes for reading, and developing greater control in writing. The course is intended

to prepare students for university, college, or the workplace.

 

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 %

 

English: Writer's Craft - EWC4U

This course emphasizes knowledge and skills related to the craft of writing. Students

will analyse models of effective writing; use a workshop approach to produce a range

of works; identify and use techniques required for specialized forms of writing; and

identify effective ways to improve the quality of their writing. They will also complete

a major paper as part of a creative or analytical independent study project and

investigate opportunities for publication and for writing careers.

Prerequisite: English, Grade 11, University Preparation

 

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 %

 

Math

 

An important part of every course in the mathematics program is the process of inquiry, in which

students develop methods for exploring new problems or unfamiliar situations. Knowing how to

learn mathematics is the underlying expectation that every student in every course needs to achieve.

An important part of the inquiry process is that of taking the conditions of a real-world situation and

representing them in mathematical form. A mathematical representation can take many different

forms – for example, it can be a physical model, a diagram, a graph, a table of values, an equation, or

a computer simulation. It is important that students recognize various mathematical representations of

given relationships and that they become increasingly familiar with sophisticated representations as they

progress through secondary school.

 

Principles of Mathematics - MPM1D

This course enables students to develop an understanding of mathematical concepts related to

algebra, analytic geometry, and measurement and geometry through investigation, the effective

use of technology, and abstract reasoning. Students will investigate relationships, which they

will then generalize as equations of lines, and will determine the connections between different

representations of a linear relation. They will also explore relationships that emerge from the

measurement of three-dimensional figures and two-dimensional shapes. Students will reason

mathematically and communicate their thinking as they solve multi-step problems.

 

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 %

Prerequisite: None

 

Principles of Mathematics - MPM2D

This course enables students to broaden their understanding of relationships and extend their

problem-solving and algebraic skills through investigation, the effective use of technology, and

abstract reasoning. Students will explore quadratic relations and their applications; solve and

apply linear systems; verify properties of geometric figures using analytic geometry; and investigate

the trigonometry of right and acute triangles. Students will reason mathematically and

communicate their thinking as they solve multi-step problems.

 

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 %

Prerequisite: MPM1D

 

Functions - MCR3U

This course introduces the mathematical concept of the function by extending students’

experiences with linear and quadratic relations. Students will investigate properties of

discrete and continuous functions, including trigonometric and exponential functions;

represent functions numerically, algebraically, and graphically; solve problems involving

applications of functions; investigate inverse functions; and develop facility in determining

equivalent algebraic expressions. Students will reason mathematically and communicate

their thinking as they solve multi-step problems.

 

Prerequisite: Principles of Mathematics, Grade 10, Academic

 

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 %

Prerequisite: MPM2D

 

Advanced Functions - MHF4U

This course extends students’ experience with functions. Students will investigate the properties of

polynomial, rational, logarithmic and trigonometric functions; broaden their understanding of rates of

change; and develop facility in applying these concepts and skills. Students will also refine their use

of the mathematical processes necessary for success in senior mathematics. This course is for students

intending to take AP Calculus and Vectors the following year. There is a more rigorous exploration of

algebra and functions and additional topics are included to prepare students for AP Calculus. Additional

topics will include an introduction to vectors, complex numbers and parametric equations.

 

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 %

Prerequisite: MCR3U

 

Calculus and Vectors - MCV4U

This course builds on students’ previous experience with functions and their developing

understanding of rates of change. Students will solve problems involving geometric and

algebraic representations of vectors and representations of lines and planes in threedimensional

space; broaden their understanding of rates of change to include the

derivatives of polynomial, sinusoidal, exponential, rational, and radical functions; and

apply these concepts and skills to the modelling of real-world relationships. Students

will also refine their use of the mathematical processes necessary for success in senior

mathematics. This course is intended for students who choose to pursue careers in fields

such as science, engineering, economics, and some areas of business, including those

students who will be required to take a university-level calculus, linear algebra, or

physics course.

Note: The new Advanced Functions course (MHF4U) must be taken prior to or

concurrently with Calculus and Vectors (MCV4U).

 

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 %

Prerequisite: MHF4U (Students in Senior Two can take MHF4U and MCV4U concurrently.)

 

Mathematics of Data Management - MDM4U

This course broadens students’ understanding of mathematics as it relates to managing

data. Students will apply methods for organizing and analysing large amounts of

information; solve problems involving probability and statistics; and carry out a

culminating investigation that integrates statistical concepts and skills. Students will

also refine their use of the mathematical processes necessary for success in senior

mathematics. Students planning to enter university programs in business, the social

sciences, and the humanities will find this course of particular interest.

Prerequisite: Functions, Grade 11, University Preparation, or Functions and Applications,

Grade 11, University/College Preparation

 

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 %

 

Core French - FSF1D

This course emphasizes the further development of oral communication, reading and writing skills.

Students will build on and apply their knowledge of French in authentic situations to further develop

proficiency and accuracy of French language use. Thematic readings, which include a variety of short

stories, articles and poems, will serve as stepping stones to oral and written activities.

 

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 %

Prerequisite: FSF8J or equivalent

 

Health and Physical Education

 

The Health and Physical Education Department combines the Physical Education and Northward Bound

programs. The aim of the department is to ensure Appleby students have healthy minds and bodies.

 

The Health and Physical Education program provides students with opportunities to improve their

personal fitness, sport skills and an understanding of healthy living principles. Students enjoy access to

Appleby’s athletic facilities including the playing fields, gymnasium, squash courts, tennis courts, cardio

room, pool and arena. Physical Education is a compulsory course for Middle One to Upper Two students,

requiring students to complete one more additional credit than stipulated in the Ontario curriculum.

 

The Northward Bound program is mandatory in Upper One and Upper Two. The program’s emphasis on

outdoor skills, fitness and leadership skills complements the students’ Physical Education studies.

 

Physical Education

 

Physical Education plays a major role in the development of the complete individual. Students are

encouraged to develop and maintain a high level of personal physical fitness, a healthy, active lifestyle,

and to develop values and social skills consistent with Appleby’s philosophy. Physical Education is

a compulsory component of the program in Middle One to Upper Two. In the early years, students

develop their gross and fine motor skills through a variety of team games, aquatics and some dual and

individual sports. Selected activities reinforce present and future leisure values, provide self-expression,

 

enjoyment and relaxation. Students develop social skills and attitudes including independence,

responsibility, leadership, co-operation, sportsmanship and an appreciation of the capabilities and

limitations of self and others. Health issues related to the age group are studied in each c

 

Health and Physical Education - PPL1O

 

The Upper One Health and Physical Education course emphasizes regular participation in a variety of

physical activities which promote lifelong healthy, active living. Students learn movement skills and

principles, ways to improve personal fitness and competence, and safety and injury prevention. They

investigate issues related to healthy sexuality and the use and abuse of alcohol, tobacco and other

drugs, and participate in activities designed to develop goal-setting, communication and social skills. The

program variety and a student’s ability to design their own active living choice prepare students to make

wise decisions about their health and lifestyle upon completing this course.

 

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 %

Prerequisite: None

 

Health and Physical Education - PPL2O

The Upper Two Health and Physical Education program continues with a strong emphasis on

participation in diverse activities and developing lifelong physical fitness routines. Students participate

in a wide range of physical activities and experiences, including suitable outdoor activities for each

season. In addition, the course emphasizes sports and activities that may lead to continued lifelong

participation. The program variety prepares students to make wise decisions about their health and

lifestyle.

 

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 %

Prerequisite: None

 

Science

 

The study of science allows a student to make a personal search for the logical patterns that explain

the behaviour of the universe. Scientific study also develops skills in thinking and problem solving,

developing the overall academic abilities of each student. Lessons on the scientific method can also

be applied to other areas of study and to many aspects of life. Appleby’s Science and Technology

program provides students with the opportunity to develop the attitudes and skills of scientific thinking,

helping them make sense of the rapidly expanding technological world. These skills enable students to

understand the major concepts of science, how the concepts were developed and how they are used to

explain the behaviour of the natural world.

 

Curiosity, honesty, rationality, perseverance and a concern for the environment are some of the

attitudes that are encouraged in this program, provided through a learning continuum from Middle One

through Senior Two. All courses are taught in fully equipped modern laboratories by subject specialists,

making full use of a laptop. Students are encouraged to apply scientific techniques and to handle

equipment intelligently and safely to gain knowledge of a phenomenon, formulate a mental or physical

 

model to represent it and develop experiments to test the model. A variety of evaluation tools are used,

including everything from authentic performance tasks to periodic tests and examinations. The weight

given to any of these evaluation tools varies by the grade level.

 

Science

 

Science - SNC1D

This course enables students to develop their understanding of basic concepts in biology,

chemistry, earth and space science, and physics, and to relate science to technology,

society, and the environment. Throughout the course, students will develop their skills

in the processes of scientific investigation. Students will acquire an understanding of

scientific theories and conduct investigations related to sustainable ecosystems; atomic

and molecular structures and the properties of elements and compounds; the study of

the universe and its properties and components; and the principles of electricity.

Prerequisite: None

 

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 %

Prerequisite: None

 

Science - SNC2D

This course enables students to enhance their understanding of concepts in biology,

chemistry, earth and space science, and physics, and of the interrelationships between

science, technology, society, and the environment. Students are also given opportunities

to further develop their scientific investigation skills. Students will plan and conduct

investigations and develop their understanding of scientific theories related to the

connections between cells and systems in animals and plants; chemical reactions, with a

particular focus on acid–base reactions; forces that affect climate and climate change; and

the interaction of light and matter.

Prerequisite: Science, Grade 9, Academic or Applied

 

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 %

Prerequisite: SNC1D

 

Upper level Science

 

Achievement of both excellence and equity underlies the three major goals of the secondary

science program. The Ontario Curriculum, Grades 11 and 12: Science, 2008 therefore outlines

not only the skills and knowledge that students are expected to develop but also the

attitudes that they will need to develop in order to use their knowledge and skills

responsibly. The three goals of the science program are as follows:

1. to relate science to technology, society, and the environment

2. to develop the skills, strategies, and habits of mind required for scientific inquiry

3. to understand the basic concepts of science

Every course in the secondary science program focuses on these three goals. The goals are

reflected within each strand of every course in the three overall expectations, which in

turn are developed in corresponding sets of related specific expectations. The same three

goals also underlie assessment of student achievement in science.

 

Biology - SBI3U

This course furthers students’ understanding of the processes that occur in biological

 

systems. Students will study theory and conduct investigations in the areas of

biodiversity; evolution; genetic processes; the structure and function of animals; and the

anatomy, growth, and function of plants. The course focuses on the theoretical aspects of

the topics under study, and helps students refine skills related to scientific investigation.

Prerequisite: Science, Grade 10, Academic

 

Biology - SBI4U

 

This course provides students with the opportunity for in-depth study of the concepts

and processes that occur in biological systems. Students will study theory and conduct

investigations in the areas of biochemistry, metabolic processes, molecular genetics,

homeostasis, and population dynamics. Emphasis will be placed on the achievement of

detailed knowledge and the refinement of skills needed for further study in various

branches of the life sciences and related fields.

Prerequisite: Biology, Grade 11, University Preparation

 

Chemistry - SCH3U

This course enables students to deepen their understanding of chemistry through the

study of the properties of chemicals and chemical bonds; chemical reactions and

quantitative relationships in those reactions; solutions and solubility; and atmospheric

chemistry and the behaviour of gases. Students will further develop their analytical

skills and investigate the qualitative and quantitative properties of matter, as well as

the impact of some common chemical reactions on society and the environment.

 

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 %

Prerequisite: SNC2D

 

Chemistry - SCH4U

This course enables students to deepen their understanding of chemistry through the study of organic

chemistry, the structure and properties of matter, energy changes and rates of reaction, equilibrium

in chemical systems, and electrochemistry. Students will further develop their problem-solving and

investigation skills as they investigate chemical processes, and will refine their ability to communicate

scientific information. Emphasis will be placed on the importance of chemistry in everyday life and on

evaluating the impact of chemical technology on the environment.

 

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 %

Prerequisite: SCH3U

 

Physics - SPH3U

This course develops students’ understanding of the basic concepts of physics. Students

will explore kinematics, with an emphasis on linear motion; different kinds of forces;

energy transformations; the properties of mechanical waves and sound; and electricity

and magnetism. They will enhance their scientific investigation skills as they test laws

of physics. In addition, they will analyse the interrelationships between physics and

technology, and consider the impact of technological applications of physics on society

and the environment.

 

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 %

Prerequisite: SNC2D

 

Physics - SPH4U

 

This course enables students to deepen their understanding of physics concepts and

theories. Students will continue their exploration of energy transformations and the forces

that affect motion, and will investigate electrical, gravitational, and magnetic fields and

electromagnetic radiation. Students will also explore the wave nature of light, quantum

mechanics, and special relativity. They will further develop their scientific investigation

skills, learning, for example, how to analyse, qualitatively and quantitatively, data related

to a variety of physics concepts and principles. Students will also consider the impact of

technological applications of physics on society and the environment.

 

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 %

Prerequisite: SPH3U

 

Earth and Space Science - SES4U

This course develops students’ understanding of Earth and its place in the universe.

Students will investigate the properties of and forces in the universe and solar system

and analyse techniques scientists use to generate knowledge about them. Students will

closely examine the materials of Earth, its internal and surficial processes, and its

geological history, and will learn how Earth’s systems interact and how they have

changed over time. Throughout the course, students will learn how these forces,

processes, and materials affect their daily lives. The course draws on biology, chemistry,

physics, and mathematics in its consideration of geological and astronomical processes

that can be observed directly or inferred from other evidence.

Prerequisite: Science, Grade 10, Academic

 

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 %

Prerequisite: SNC2D

 

Canadian Geography - CGC1D

This course uses a variety of frameworks to examine the principles of physical, human and economic

geography within Canada while highlighting the distinct and evolving character of the country.

Students investigate the interconnections among the landforms, climate, soil, plants, animals and

human activities in Canadian ecozones to develop geographic knowledge and skills that contribute

to an understanding of Canada’s diversity and its role the world. They examine the components of

natural and human systems and how they interact and influence one another. Students also study

Canada’s relationship with the global community as they work towards a culminating task on sustainable

development. Geotechnologies are used throughout the course to assist the students with their

understanding of the course material.

 

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 %

Prerequisite: None

 

Canadian History - CHC2D

This course explores Canadian participation in global events and traces our development as a country

through changes in population, the economy and technology. Students analyze the elements that

constitute Canadian identity, learn the stories of both individuals and communities and study the

evolution of political and social structures. Students learn about differing interpretations of the past

and come to understand the importance of chronology and cause-and-effect relationships in historical

studies. They also write a research essay and, in the process, learn to develop a thesis, conduct detailed

research and analysis and effectively communicate the results of their inquiries. Using technology to

develop research skills is a significant feature of the course.

 

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 %

Prerequisite: None

 

Civics - CHV2O5

What does it mean to live in a democracy? What are our rights and responsibilities as democratic

citizens in the contemporary world? How is our understanding of democracy different from that of

other nations? This course examines these issues as they relate to what it means to be a responsible

citizen. Students explore significant questions about public life, and how to be responsible and active

in our society. The focus is on our local political world in Oakville, Southern Ontario and Canada, but

comparisons are made with other regions and nations around the world. In a series of lectures, students

gain background knowledge of the world of civic life, then explore the issues raised through active

involvement in the Toskan Youth Philanthropic Initiative with a local grassroots non-profit organization.

A number of required Appleby programs such as Chapel and the Northward Bound program further deal

with the content of this course.

 

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 %

Prerequisite: None

 

Canadian and World Issues: A Geographic Analysis - CGW4U

This course draws on geographic concepts, skills, methods and technologies to analyze significant

issues facing Canadians as citizens of an interdependent world. Students examine the challenges of

creating a sustainable and equitable future through the study of a range of topics including economic

interdependence, geopolitical conflict, regional disparities in the ability to meet basic human needs and

protection of the planet’s life-support systems.

 

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 %

Prerequisite: HRT3M

 

World History: The West and the World AP - CHY4U

This course investigates the major trends in Western civilization and world history to the present.

Students learn about the interaction between the emerging West and other regions of the world and

about the development of modern social, political and economic systems. The skills and knowledge

developed in this course enable students to understand and appreciate both the character of historical

change and the historical roots of contemporary issues. Students have an opportunity to write an

AP examination in World history, testing their knowledge and understanding of global processes and

contacts. Students are prepared for this examination through the existing World History course, as well

as through in-depth reading, comparing and analyzing diverse historical texts. Students will be advised

whether or not to write the examination after their first reporting period on criteria such as strong

achievement, solid analytical skills and keen interest. The AP examination takes place in May of each

year.

 

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 %

Prerequisite: Senior One Social Science credit

 

Economics AP - CIA4U

This course explores the choices that individuals and societies make about the use of resources in

a competitive global economy. Students use economic concepts and models as well as methods of

economic inquiry to analyze current economic issues and make informed economic choices based on

their analysis. Students have the opportunity to write the AP examination in Macroeconomics and are

prepared for this examination through the existing course material, supplemented by readings and

tutorial classes. An AP course is designed to give you a thorough understanding of the principles of

economics that apply to an economic system as a whole. Such a course places particular emphasis on

the study of national income and price determination, and also develops your familiarity with economic

performance measures, economic growth, and international economics.

 

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 %

Prerequisite: Senior One Social Science credit

 

World Geography AP - CGU4U

This course examines how cultures in different parts of the world interact with their environments and

with each other. Students use geographic concepts, methods and tools to explore settlement patterns,

human migration, cultural change, globalization, environmental issues and other topics relevant to

an understanding of how spatial, political, economic and social factors affect settled environments

and human activities. With departmental approval, students may elect to prepare for the AP Human

Geography exam in this course. The AP examination takes place in May of each year.

 

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 %

Prerequisite: Senior One Social Science credit

 

Canadian and World Politics - CPW4U

This course examines national and international political issues from a variety of perspectives. Students

learn about the rights and responsibilities of individuals, groups and states within the international

community; analyze the different ways in which Canada tries to settle its conflicts with other nations;

and evaluate the role of nationalist and internationalist ideologies in shaping relations among states.

 

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 %

Prerequisite: Senior One Social Science credit

 

Philosophy: Questions and Theories - HZT4U

This course addresses three (or more) of the central areas of philosophy: metaphysics, logic,

epistemology, ethics, social and political philosophy, and aesthetics. Students learn critical-thinking

skills, the key ideas expressed by philosophers from a variety of the world’s traditions, how to develop

and explain their own philosophical ideas, and how to apply those ideas to contemporary social

issues and personal experiences. The course also helps students refine skills used in researching and

investigating topics in philosophy.

 

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 %

Prerequisite: Senior One Social Science credit

 

Canadian and International Law - CLN4U

This course examines elements of Canadian and international law in social, political, and global contexts.

Students will study the historical and philosophical sources of law, human rights law, criminal law, and

the principles and practices of international law and will learn to relate them to issues in Canadian

society and the wider world. Students will use critical-thinking and communication skills to analyse legal

issues, conduct independent research , and present the results of their inquiries in a variety of ways.

 

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 %

Prerequisite: Senior One Social Science credit

 

Canadian and International Business Perspectives - BBB4M

This course provides an overview of the importance of international business and trade in the global

economy and explores the factors that influence success in international markets. Students will learn

about the techniques and strategies associated with marketing, distribution, and managing international

business effectively. In addition to the exploring the world of international business through case studies

and contemporary examples of entrepreneurship offered in the curriculum, the course offers students

an exclusive opportunity to become engaged as entrepreneurs in the international business market.

With the skills and knowledge acquired in the course, students apply their skills as they work through a

company incubation program which provides them with real entrepreneurial experience as they start

and run a small business and engage in all levels of business operations.

 

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 %

Prerequisite: Senior One Social Science credit

 

Accounting - BAT4M

This course emphasizes the study of accounting principles related to financial statements. Students learn

about ways in which information in these statements is used in making business decisions. The focus of

this course is on the financial statements and understanding the various components of the statements.

Students learn different methods of inventory valuation and amortization and how to account for capital

assets and prepare a Cash Flow Statement. Students also study various means of financing a business

and ways in which the strength of a corporation can be determined through the reading of its annual

report by using various methods of financial analysis.

 

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 %

Prerequisite: BAF3M